Can You Relate To Sally?

Beauty model girl taking colorful donuts. Dieting concept
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Sally was a training freak

And I mean that in a good way.

She would train every day with the intensity of a seasoned athlete. Sally repeated this for months on end, and as her trainer, I couldn’t ask for a more committed client.

So you would think she would have the body of her dreams, right?

Wrong.

Sally would occassionally blow her diet, and go off plan.

Then it was a down hill disaster for the rest of the day.

In her mind, having just one or two squares of chocolate was a ruined week. She then felt guilty, and gorged her way through chips, ice cream, pasta, and even buffet dinner’s on her own.

If Sally had just stopped at the small serve of chocolate, she would be at her goal body.

She saw herself as a failure when she ate anything she labelled as “unhealthy”.

She felt guilty, beat herself up, and then turned to food to feel better.

The chocolate didn’t do any damage – the negative associations did.



Here's My Point

Going off your plan slightly, or even eating TWICE as much food as you’re supposed to, does not make you a bad person or a failure.

You know what it makes you?

NORMAL.

These things happen.

From time to time, you are going to have a chocolate or a glass of wine. The best thing you can do when this happens is to accept it.

Accept that it happened. Nobody slips up on purpose. So stop wasting time beating yourself up over ONE small mistake.



Trust Me...

I’ve been there before, and battled with guilty eating and food anxiety.

But from going through that, I know that guilt is a horrible emotion.

Instead of wasting energy on feeling guilty, use the extra calories to fuel an intense session, and then get back on track ASAP.

Move on.
Keep going.
Don’t stop.

Simply get back on track immediately.

Don’t reduce your meals the next day, or triple your workout time to “catch up”.

Smashing yourself into the ground and not nourishing your body is one step closer to burnout.

It’s not sustainable, and is not a healthy way to view long-term health.

Remember…

Sh*t WILL happen!

One bad decision doesn’t mean a bad day, or week, or year. And it definitely doesn’t make you a bad person!

Accept that we all make mistakes…

Simply return to being the best you you can be, and move on!

Pete